2010 06 08 – NGC 6207/H 2. 701

2010 June 8, 0330 UT
PCW Memorial Observatory, Zanesville, Ohio USA – Erika Rix
16” Zhumell, 8mm TeleVue Plossl, magnification ~225x
Temp: 10C, Humidity 74%
Seeing: P 7, Transparency: 3/6

NGC 6207, H701, UGC 10521 Galaxy type SA(s)c III
Lens-shaped spiral in Hercules just 28’ NNE of M13
RA 16:43.1, Dec +36:50, Her “400”
Stellar nucleus, 3.0’ x 1.1’, magnitude 11.6v

click on image for larger view

Sketch created scopeside with Rite in the Rain paper, black ballpoint ink pen, #2 pencil then the stars cleaned up in Photoshop and inverted with adjustment to brightness and contrast.


(As written from my notes on June 8th, 2010):

The light pollution was terrible tonight. The sky above a local factory lit up like a bright dome. Seems to be worse this year and I was forced to put up the southern drop down wall of the observatory to block out the excess light.

Nevertheless, it was a very enjoyable night under the stars and the Milky Way was still visible. M13, ol’ faithful, was the first to be viewed. I started off with a 13mm Ethos and then dropped down to an 8mm TV Plossl. The number of individual stars in the globular cluster that popped out was amazing.

Switching back to the 13mm, I pushed the scope across slightly to NGC 6207, and then switched back to the 8mm again for a closer look. NGC 6207 is located ~ 1/2 degree NE of M13.

Screenshot from "The Sky", Version 5

The nucleus was stellar, but I was unable to really pinpoint exactly where the brightest area was. I had to view with averted vision and believe I have it placed fairly accurately.

According to The Night Sky Observers Guide, Volume 2, using 12″-14″ scopes @ 125x:

…NGC 6207 is enclosed in a triangle of 12th magnitude stars. Its fairly bright 2′ x 0.75′ NE-SSE halo has tapered ends and contains a stellar nucleus.

The tapered ends were allusive…in fact, they were diffuse and seemed to dissolve as they extended outward. For a closer look, please check out the link NGC 6207 from The NGC/IC Project by Robert E. Erdmann, Jr.

For additional reading, Tom Trusock’s Small Wonders: Hercules (7/09) article found on Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews is an excellent guide for the constellation Hercules.

References:

The Night Sky Observer’s Guide, Vol. 2, by Kepple and Sanner, pg. 198
www.cloudynights.com
Best of AOP
Ole’s Astronomy Site – Supernovae
William Herschel’s Deep Sky Catalog

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~ by Erika Rix on December 2, 2010.

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